Governor Brown Issues Insane Veto As Former “Three Strikes” Law Brought Up

Jerry Brown vetoed AB 1408 this weekend that would have ensured repeat probation violators were put back in jail. He ignorantly said it was too much like the three strikes law and denied it.

Jerry Brown vetoed AB 1408 this weekend, which would have ensured repeat probation violators were put back in jail. He ignorantly said it was too much like the three strikes law and denied it.

Governor Brown in California works hard to ensure that the liberal ideal will be implemented, and the results have been exactly what was expected. Homelessness fills the streets of major cities, illegal immigrants and pedophiles dressed in women’s clothing run free, and police are forbidden to enforce federal laws. Now Brown has added another item to the list of leftist policies enacted. He has vetoed a bill that would keep probation offenders in jail.

Assemblyman Ian Calderon introduced the bill that would require putting felons who violate probation three times back in jail. It would have been the first state legislation that addressed the death of Whittier Police Officer Keith Boyer. He was killed in February after a repeat offender had circulated through the court systems again and again.

Michael Christopher Mejia constantly violated his probation. After serving his full sentence for robbery and grand theft (while out on parole), he crashed a stolen vehicle and was confronted by Boyer and Officer Patrick Hazell. The ensuing shootout claimed the life of the law enforcement official.

The measure was proposed after a policeman was gunned down by a felon on probation, who had repeatedly violated it.

The measure was proposed after a policeman was gunned down by a felon on probation, who had repeatedly violated it.

AB 1408 was “a result of intense discussion with the law enforcement community,” Calderon explained. He added that he believed the bill “will help prevent tragedies like what we witnessed on Feb. 20.”

It included provisions to lock up people who make a career out of criminal activity. These repeat offenders revolve in and out of the penal system until they either do something that gets them locked up for good, or they get killed.

In addition to third-time probation offenses being grounds for incarceration, the measure would have asked parole board members to consider the criminal history of the offender. For example, if a person had never been convicted before, had no gang affiliation, or drug addictions, parole would proceed like normal.

Although Whittier Officer Kieth Boyer is dead, he would still be alive if California didn't have such a lax justice system.

Although Whittier Officer Kieth Boyer is dead, he would still be alive if California didn’t have such a lax justice system.

However, if a criminal had a history of prison time, multiple crimes, and other general low life behavior, the Board could factor those considerations in when deciding whether or not to turn the convict back out on the streets.

The bill was also designed to improve information sharing between probation departments and the parole board. However, voters in the state have passed propositions that reduce certain charges to misdemeanors and help accelerate non-violent criminals through the system.

Of course, liberals at the University of California claim that violent crimes have not increased in the state and that no such measure is needed. Calderon claimed that none of those provisions would be impacted by the new probation measure.

The measure was voted yes by every member of the Assembly and the Senate, but Brown chose to implement his own personal brand of liberalism.

The measure was voted yes by every member of the Assembly and the Senate, but Brown chose to implement his own personal brand of liberalism.

“AB 1408 does not undo the steps the state has taken to address its prison overcrowding problem,” Calderon said. “But it does endeavor to set some practical ground rules and enhance the tools available to law enforcement operating under these reforms.”

However, that wasn’t good enough for super-liberal Jerry Brown. He gleefully vetoed the bill that would have removed some of these career criminals off the streets this weekend.

“I do not agree with a three-strikes-and-you’re-out approach is the correct solution. This would undermine the sound discretion of local probation authorities, who by training and sworn responsibility, are in the best position to make determinations on what types of sanctions or punishment should be imposed,” Brown said in the veto statement.

Whittier Mayor Joe Vinatieri was truly disappointed and said, “This was a very measured bill that would have helped greatly, especially the portion where the state could have looked at a felon’s complete history of violence, which they’re not allowed to do now. In light of the overwhelming support for this measured response, it’s time for an initiative. It’s time for the people to stand up and say enough is enough.”

Although the bill was supported by both conservatives and liberals in the assembly and senate, Brown chose his own brand of leftist policy.

Mejia is now being held on murder charges for the death of Boyer. Yet, if he’d never been released after the third time that he violated his probation, he wouldn’t have been able to steal a car and kill a policeman.

The liberal agenda is working perfectly in California. As the state starts to resemble more and more of a third-world country, now more than ever conservatives there must fight to keep it from tumbling into the abyss. It’s pretty close to it now and the veto by Brown pushed it just a little bit further toward the edge.

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